Posted in Desmos, Geometry, InfoNotes, Quadrilaterals

Quadrilateral InfoNotes

When we were fully remote and then hybrid, I wanted to give my students options in their learning and I wanted one of the learning options to be visual. When I set up my Canvas for a lesson, I have a table where the left side is read and the right side is watch. On the left side I include these infonotes (yes, I made that up but it’s my blog so I can, LOL) and some hand written notes. On the watch side I include videos, some made by me and some that I have found. Some students (I’m one of those students) don’t like to watch videos, but some students don’t understand without the video. This gives them the option to learn with a style that is best for them.

Now that we are back in person, I still post these options. They can learn from me, or they can chose to read or watch videos.

I’ve included my infonotes for the quadrilateral unit. I have them for every unit in Geometry so I’ll need to get around to posting those :-).

I also used these two activities I have previously posted as an exploration for interior and exterior angles.

I modified these Desmos activities I found to use with this unit. They are wonderful as is, but some of my lower functioning kiddos struggle with explaining so we have a conversation instead of typing. I posted the original activities below so it also gives credit to the author. One day soon (as soon as my dissertation is done) I will be creating in Desmos!!!

A few weeks ago I shared the Exit Tickets I created for this unit. Click here to see that post.

And last but not least, I have an Escape Room that I use as a review for Quadrilaterals. If you want to see your students submissions, just make your own Google Form and have students use yours instead of the one on the escape room site.

You should be set to teach Quadrilaterals. I hope you find something you can use.

Posted in comics, Geometry, Quadrilaterals

Quadrilateral Comics

This idea has been rolling around in my head, especially when I’m on the elliptical working out, so I’m excited to try it out with students.

The idea behind this activity is to get students to think about the properties of quadrilaterals. There are so many rules to remember and there isn’t a ton of application. I know what you are thinking, then why are we teaching it? Well, it’s still one of our state standards and it’s on the ACT/SAT test, and there is some great logical thinking that happens during this unit.

They will create a comic with two quadrilaterals. In the comic, they must work at least 3 properties for each quadrilateral into the story. The characters are the quadrilaterals themselves.

I wanted this to be 8.5 x 11 so we can put it in iBooks or Kindle when we are finished. Wait, you didn’t know you could do that? Never fear, the instructions are listed below.

I created my own template but I also share others that I have altered and some that aren’t altered but you can use if you don’t care about making it an actual book.

I will begin this with students tomorrow so I will update this with students samples once I have them. Here is an example comic I made to show students.

I have also created the activity sheet that I will post in Canvas. I plan to introduce this after our Geogebra Exploration and then give them the entire unit to complete it.

Once your comic completed, you can go to File-Download as PDF. I move this to my GoogleDrive. On you phone or iPad, go to the file in Drive and click the 3 dots in the corner. Click open in and scroll to the end of your apps where is says more. Once you select more, Kindle and iBooks are both an option. It won’t work with Kindle if the file is too big.

I have some additional tips and tricks for creating comics on infinitelyteaching.com. Check out that post for more ideas.

Let me know if you use this idea. I love to see the creations from other classrooms.

Posted in Activities, Distance Learning, Exit Ticket, Geometry, Scale Factor, Similarity

Similarity Exit Tickets

As promised last week, here are some exit tickets that you can use with a Similarity Unit in Geometry. Just a reminder of how I use these. I give feedback on each submission and have students work on them until they are correct. I love doing this with the comment feature in Google Slides. In Canvas, I am using the Google Assignments LTI so it looks just like Google Classroom.

Now, you might not want my Bitmoji on your slides. I mean, she’s cute, but I get it! You can go to view-master and change the Bitmoji there. I changed my jacket color for each day. One student told me he was excited each day during the lesson to see what color the jacket would be but slightly less excited about the math. 😂 Whatever gets them there!

I hope you find these useful. I share them to save you some time! I really like exit tickets because it helps me fix misconceptions quickly.

Posted in Activities, Geometry, Google Slides, Thinking Questions, Triangle Congruence, Triangle Theorems

Exit Tickets for Triangles Unit

It’s nice when you find an activity that you can just USE. If you are getting ready to teach or review triangle congruence, hopefully these exit tickets will be helpful.

I give these the same day I teach a new lesson. Students get feedback from me until they have correct answers. It has worked very well during our hybrid schedule but I plan to keep doing it when we go back in person.

These slides are interactive so you will want to make a copy for each student. You can edit the content by going to view-Master. I create it there so the static parts don’t move.

Each one is set to template. If you would like to keep the activity, just select the get template button in the top right corner.

Corresponding Congruent Parts

Isosceles and Equilateral Triangle Theorems

Triangle Sum and Exterior Angle Theorems

Triangle Congruence Theorems

Triangle Congruence Proofs

I hope you find these useful. I am working on a set for Similarity. I’ll post them soon!

Posted in Geometry, Google Sheets, Triangle Congruence

Road Kill Kafe goes Remote

Well that sounds like a movie title.

I wanted to share with you a quick update to Road Kill Kafe that I use in my Geometry class to discover congruent triangles. It was shared with me by my friend Craig Klement (@CraigKlement) and you can read about all of my Triangle Congruence activities here.

We are hybrid this year and it usually takes 2 days to complete the activity. That’s 4 class days with both classes and we simply didn’t have the time to do that.

So… I turned it into a digital activity. It worked out ok. I did model some skills for them regarding the drawing tools in Google Slides and that made things go more smoothly. I also pasted a reference segment so we could make sure our side lengths were what they should be.

Here are some images of our completed triangles.

If this is your original activity, let me know! I would love to give proper credit. If you want to try Road Kill Kafe goes Remote, just click on the links below. The first one is the activity to send to students. Make a copy for EACH student. The second one is the collaborative slide with the reference segments for students to paste their completed triangles. Make sure you set it so EVERYONE has access to the same slide.

Remote Road Kill Kafe

Collaborative Slide

Enjoy your road kill!!

Posted in Activities, Digital Manipulatives, Distance Learning, Geometry, Triangle Theorems

Geometry Flipbook

I am not a paperless classroom. As I say in my book, use technology if

  1. it makes your job easier
  2. it makes the learning better for students.

So why a digital flipbook? Well, it’s actually not just one reason.

  1. We have to go remote this fall, not because of Covid but because we have “spores” in our building that required them to close the building, throw away all of our porous material (i.e. books, saved foldables and student work, 20 years of personal books and memories).
  2. I know some of my students won’t have paper at home to make a foldable while remote.
  3. Umm… my foldables are all gone (see reason 1). They were thrown away 😦 If they had been digital, it would still have them.
  4. I saw this idea in a TikTok by @adungan and knew this was my solution.

I recreated one of our foldables that was destroyed. I plan, with all of my digital lessons, to have students take pictures of their work and paste it in the foldable (or notes or practice, etc). I don’t want them to have to draw every image, but I also don’t want phantom floating notes so when they look at them there is no image or problem to reference.

I made a little tutorial that I am posting in Canvas/Google Classroom (this has been another huge debacle) to help them create a good scan and clip their images. (This is a Slides Mania notebook template)

Here is the foldable as the students will see it. I will put it in Google Classroom and set it to make a copy.

If you are putting this in Canvas, make sure you force a copy. Here is a gif from Jake Miller (@JakeMillerTech) to help you with that.

And here is a completed copy with student work snipped and uploaded into the document.

If you want the template, here is a link. You can also snag a copy on Slides Mania in the By EDU for EDU section. Paula is AMAZING and creates great stuff. She is also kind enough to share what others teachers create.

Now, if you are adventurous and want to make your own, I created a tutorial posted on InfinitelyTeaching. You will also find a 6 topic template posted there ;-).

Tutorial

If you use this, please let me know on Twitter. I LOVE to see what people create. Tag me @MandiTolenEDU and use #MMNS and #infinitelyteaching.

Posted in Activities, Algebra 1, Distance Learning, Functions, Geometry, Google Slides, Notability

Multiple Representations for Leaners

This summer I have spent some (a lot) of my time writing curriculum for our Virtual Academy. One thing I have focused on is multiple representations of the content for each concept. I’m hoping to better meet the needs of all my learners. I broke by options into two categories, Read and Watch (Listen). Students are given the choice of which way they would prefer to learn the material and it provides additional resources if they need reinforcement.

Remember, this doesn’t have to be limited to virtual learning. Students in your classroom will benefit from multiple representations too.

Videos (Watch, Listen)

There are many options for using videos in your lessons. I have listed a few of my favorites below.

Make Your Own

I like to use Notability on my iPad. I have some tutorials on how I create my videos and upload to Google Drive and or YouTube, (YouTube adds closed captioning). If you watch your students, you will notice many of them watching videos with closed-captioning on. This not only meets accessibility needs for students, but also meets their learning style.

Videos from Others

You can find so many videos that are already created. I like this option because students need to hear information multiple ways. You are teaching it one way and videos from someone else may say the same thing in a different way. For my lessons, I used Kahn Academy, CK-12, and Delta Math, and YouTube. You would think this saves time, but you do have to watch the videos before you post them so it works out to be about the same amount of time.

Infographics (Read)

I created an infographic for each lesson. This allows a student who like visual representations an option for learning. A few are shared below; feel free to use them. Please do not sell these. Some of the examples are from various resources I have so I do not want any of us violating copyright laws.

click for template
click for template
click for template

I have also adapted a few of my classroom posters into virtual “posters” or infographics. This one is based on a bulletin board set from Sarah Carter (@mathequalslove). I love this set, so I updated it for my virtual classroom.

click for template

Notes (Read and/or Watch)

One of the things I LOVE about Notability is the created PDF file for each note I write. I have these set to save to my Google Drive and I can easily share them with students. I include written examples as part of my visual learning options. Sometimes I also make a video of the examples (if the videos I select don’t have examples) and sometimes I just post the written version.

Check for Understanding

If I were in the classroom, I would walk around and check for understanding with each student. Virtually, I wanted a way for students to check their own understanding. I did not make this worth points and I had students self-report instead of returning the check for understanding to me.

Online Resources

I use checks from Kahn Academy, Delta Math, and CK-12. All three of these offer short checks for understanding with links to additional resources. I also use Desmos and Geogebra activities, making sure I provide the answers within the activity so students don’t need to rely on me to check their work.

Google Slides

I have often used self-checking slides in my classroom so I have a nice supply I can use for virtual learning. In the classroom, these allow me to differentiate based on student needs while I walk around the classroom and help individual students. Virtually, it’s a great quick check for understanding. I have shared a few below.

click to open
click to open

Here is a quick tutorial to create your own. You can also use step 1 of this tutorial for more elaborate instructions on using the Master Slide.

click to view

This is all just one step for each of my lessons. I also have launch type activities such as Which One Doesn’t Belong, Number Talks, Puzzles, and Open-Ended Question. I try to include some kind of activity, a reflection, and practice for each lesson too. I’ll share some of these resources soon.

I would love see anything you create or use from the ideas you see here. Tag me on Twitter @MandiTolenEDU.

Happy creating!

Posted in Covid-19, Distance Learning, Equations of Circles, Equations of Lines, Geometry, Parallel Lines

Geometric Town Virtual Learning Update

I have been using the Geometric Town project for years. You can read about it from my original post and also obtain the non-digital version. During this crazy Covid-19 quarantine, I’ve been updating my activities to make them more virtual learning friendly. In this situation, I gave students the choice to complete this activity digitally or on paper.

There are components of this project that I like on paper, like graphing equations by hand and students using their creativity with their buildings.  Other benefits became evident when I created this digitally. The use of Desmos to create the graphs and the use of digital icons made correcting misconceptions much easier.

Either way, this is still a fun project that reviews many of standards from the year.

I hope this activity is something you can use.

 

Geometric Town MMNS
Click here for the activity template

Posted in Algebra 1, Digital Manipulatives, Geometry, Google Slides

Digital Manipulatives

Have you seen a teenagers backpack? Three weeks into school and the protractor I asked them to buy is already in pieces in the bottom of their backpack. Books, binders, and a computer have been shoved into that backpack and the protractor is now broken. Or maybe they couldn’t afford school supplies to begin with. Protractors are not usually among the free supplies students can get. There are many reasons to use digital manipulatives, this is just one example, and inspiration behind my measuring angles activity. Created in Google Slides with a transparent protractor (google transparent protractor), students can move and rotate the protractor to practice measuring angles.

The balancing equations activity and the algebra tiles were created out of need for manipulatives but no funds to purchase them. Creating them digitally allowed me to have a set of manipulatives for every student.

A third reason to use digital manipulatives, blended and virtual learning. In this crazy Covid-19 time, we can’t send algebra tiles home with students, and not everyone has a protractor or ruler at home, but we can provide them with one digitally.

I create my manipulatives in Google Slides, but Google Drawing will work too. You can set any piece that you don’t want to move as the background so students don’t get frustrated. I may have learned this that hard way. Design the parts you don’t want to move. When you are ready, go to File – Download as PNG. Then click on the background button in the toolbar and choose an image from a file. Once the image is uploaded, you can delete everything. Your background will be behind it all. After your background is set, start creating the moving parts or parts you want the to type in.

Here are three digital manipulatives I’ve created for my classroom. If you use these in your classroom or with virtual learning, I would love to hear how it goes.

Balancing Equations MMNS                     Algebra Tiles MMNS

Measure Angles with Protractor MMNS