Posted in BreakIN, Circles, Covid-19, Distance Learning, Equations of Lines, games

Donkey Kong Break In Distance Learning Style

I created this activity last year to review equations of lines and learning about equations of circles. It was completed in groups by table but the delivery was mostly work at their own pace. Well, this was perfect for distance learning. I changed from groups to individual, added some Google Forms practice checks that students could complete as many times as needed until they were 100% correct, and some video notes where I would normally have given a few notes.

So far it has been a huge success. I love giving individual feedback for each student and I love to see the questions they have when they get stuck. I feel like they are learning a lot AND having fun.

7th Donkey Kong Equations (3)
click here to get the template

 

Posted in Activities, BreakIN, Circles, Equations of Lines, games, Geometry, Google Slides

Break-In Game

Matt Miller had a guest post on his blog a while back by John Meehan on a game concept called QR BreakIN. I love to create BreakOUT games so this idea had me intrigued. John’s graphics were amazing and the game boards looked fun. I pondered how to use it in my math classroom for quite a while until an idea finally surfaced.

A few areas had me stumped.  1. I needed the tasks to be sequential and most games boards where you roll dice are random. 2. I didn’t think, unless it was a review day, I could accomplish much in our 45 minute class period using his format.

I used John’s template but with my own twists. I came up with the Donkey Kong idea because jumping the barrels creates the progression of tasks that I needed. I also made this a unit long game instead of one day. Reading more information on John’s blog, I found a post he had about Power-Ups, so I incorporated that into this game too.

Link to Slide Deck  (All graphics were created in Google Drawing)

7th Donkey Kong Equations (3)          7th Donkey Kong Equations (4)

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Since the game would be completed over 2 weeks, I made my game board and game pieces electronic. I also wanted to use Google Classroom to release the tasks instead of using QR codes, mainly because our student laptops aren’t the best and they don’t play nice with QR readers.

Donkey Kong Equations (3).png  Screen Shot 2019-04-04 at 9.27.11 AM

Here are my takeaways from this unit long game.

Game Board

I like that I can open the slide from day to day and update the progress of the game instead of moving it from the board and putting it back for each class daily (I did this in 3 classes). However, I felt like it took me longer than I wanted to get the board updated because I was checking and releasing tasks.

Narrator Cards

GENIUS! I gave my students 3 for the unit. The cards could be used to ask a content question of the Narrator. You know what happened? They asked each other instead, just as I had hoped. We are nearing the end of the unit and NO ONE has used a card. They have worked together as a team to find solutions.

Google Classroom instead of QR codes

This one was tricky for me because of the time issue. I did load each post ahead of time as a draft and then I could release to each group as they were ready. This still took more time than I wanted to spend. It would be much simpler to have the QR codes, but I also like that the tasks are still in Google Classroom if they want to reference them.

Student motivation

Wow, kids are serious about earning Power-Ups. If a student did not complete their practice, the team was ALL OVER THEM.  I had more practice completed this unit than ever before.  Students were also, mostly, positive in their encouragement of their team.

Would I do this again? YES. This has been a fun way to present a short and mostly review unit for my students. They seem to be enjoying it.

Check out the hashtag #QRBreakIN on Twitter and also lurk around John’s blog. He does some amazing things with students.

 

Posted in Activities, games, Google Slides, Parallel Lines

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game with Google Slides

I try to incorporate an activity into every lesson. My goal is to make math not suck and sitting and taking notes is not the way to do it. A colleague found this memory game in an investigation for parallel and perpendicular lines from Wapakonta High School (sorry, I don’t know who to credit.) I love this type of activity but I HATE cutting out paper and having to keep track of the paper from year to year. I played around with Google Slides until I came up with a workable electronic memory game.

I included the instructions in the memory game, delete two cards and if they are a match, keep them deleted. If they don’t match, control z twice and put them back. I made the graphs a background image so they wouldn’t be deleted by accident.

Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game (2)

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Parallel & Perpendicular Memory Game

It was fun and it was great practice for identifying parallel and perpendicular from a slope. A few areas of improvement from the students, make the graphs bigger and make the cards images because they kept clicking on the ? and deleting it instead.

Here’s a link to the slide. If you are interested in creating your own, click over to Infinitely Teaching for the tutorial.

Posted in Activities, comparing functions, games, no tech

Two Truths & a Lie

Who doesn’t love two truths and a lie? I picked up this idea from a fellow teacher. She doesn’t tweet but I want to give a shout out to Ms. Wood for this one. We started doing this during the comparing functions unit but you could do this with any unit. Imagine solving equations where two were solved correctly and one wasn’t. Great way to encourage students to defend their answers.

I do this in groups. The whole group has to agree what the lie is and be able to explain why. The lies are supposed to be based on common misconceptions, not some random wrong answer. The team presenting gets points if no one guesses correctly. Each guessing team writes on a whiteboard to commit to an answer. The team gets a point if the pick the correct lie. They get an additional point if they can accurately explain why it’s a lie.

Anytime you can make learning a game students love it. I love that we are sneaking critical thinking into the game.

Here are some examples of papers created. You decide what the lie is.

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We have created these on individual whiteboards, scrap paper, and large chart paper. Whatever you have will work. I do recommend thicker markers if using paper. If not, the back of the room can’t see.

Please share topics you use two truths and a lie with. We would love to use them too.