Posted in Digital Manipulatives

Digital Decks of Cards

As I was perusing Twitter last week, I came across someone asking if their activity could be made into a Google Slide. For some reason I cannot resist the urge to “see if I can do it”!!! [On a side note, self care tells me I really SHOULD resist this urge ☺️] So I did it! I created a digital version of her game.

First, this game looks like a fun way to add three digit numbers, there is not one right answer, and students are not competing based on correct answer rather how close they get to 1,000.

Click for template

I REALLY liked the “shuffle” idea I came up with for this game and thought, WOW, I could use the idea for a regular deck of cards. I began looking for a deck of cards and ran into a snag… I didn’t want to use someone else’s card due to copyright and I’m simply too cheap to buy them. So… I made them. Please don’t laugh at my King, Queen, and Jack. I did my best 😂. The good news is, they are free and Creative Commons licensed to me so just give me credit if you use them.

The instructions to shuffle are in both of activities. Make sure you don’t just drag the cards. You have to DUPLICATE the card or the layering will not be in the correct order. Once you have created your decks, you can copy the whole deck and paste it into any other Google Slide activity you have created. Create multiple slides, to have multiple “shuffled card” options.

click for template

After I made this activity, I saw the John Meehan (@MeehanEDU) had also made one. In his activity, he has a created deck of cards (his doesn’t “flip over” with the cover card) and he just changes the order. I couldn’t quickly find it, but he shared it on Twitter.

If you use either of these activities, give me a shoutout on social media. It makes my day when others can use what I share.

Posted in Activities, Digital Manipulatives, Distance Learning, Geometry, Triangle Theorems

Geometry Flipbook

I am not a paperless classroom. As I say in my book, use technology if

  1. it makes your job easier
  2. it makes the learning better for students.

So why a digital flipbook? Well, it’s actually not just one reason.

  1. We have to go remote this fall, not because of Covid but because we have “spores” in our building that required them to close the building, throw away all of our porous material (i.e. books, saved foldables and student work, 20 years of personal books and memories).
  2. I know some of my students won’t have paper at home to make a foldable while remote.
  3. Umm… my foldables are all gone (see reason 1). They were thrown away 😦 If they had been digital, it would still have them.
  4. I saw this idea in a TikTok by @adungan and knew this was my solution.

I recreated one of our foldables that was destroyed. I plan, with all of my digital lessons, to have students take pictures of their work and paste it in the foldable (or notes or practice, etc). I don’t want them to have to draw every image, but I also don’t want phantom floating notes so when they look at them there is no image or problem to reference.

I made a little tutorial that I am posting in Canvas/Google Classroom (this has been another huge debacle) to help them create a good scan and clip their images. (This is a Slides Mania notebook template)

Here is the foldable as the students will see it. I will put it in Google Classroom and set it to make a copy.

If you are putting this in Canvas, make sure you force a copy. Here is a gif from Jake Miller (@JakeMillerTech) to help you with that.

And here is a completed copy with student work snipped and uploaded into the document.

If you want the template, here is a link. You can also snag a copy on Slides Mania in the By EDU for EDU section. Paula is AMAZING and creates great stuff. She is also kind enough to share what others teachers create.

Now, if you are adventurous and want to make your own, I created a tutorial posted on InfinitelyTeaching. You will also find a 6 topic template posted there ;-).

Tutorial

If you use this, please let me know on Twitter. I LOVE to see what people create. Tag me @MandiTolenEDU and use #MMNS and #infinitelyteaching.

Posted in Covid-19, Digital Manipulatives, Distance Learning, Google Slides

Digital Manipulatives

In this season of virtual learning, digital manipulatives are more important than ever. There are a few I have used over the years in my own classroom like the protractor, ruler, algebra tiles, and algebra balance scale. I created them to fulfill a need in my class. My students can’t always purchase these supplies, or if they do, they are broken by the time we need them.

At a conference last week, I had elementary teachers ask if I had additional resources or digital tool websites for teachers. I did have resources, but they were in many different places. I’ve created a Wakelet of these resources to make it easier and included the link below. I will continue to add to it.

click to go to Wakelet

I’ve also had the request to include more elementary related material. I have an elementary friend who will be sharing some of her resources here but I would LOVE to feature you on my blog. If you have a fun learning activity that Makes Math Not Suck for elementary students, email me at mtolen13@gmail.com. We could set up a guest blog post OR I can simply feature your activity.

Posted in Algebra 1, Digital Manipulatives, Geometry, Google Slides

Digital Manipulatives

Have you seen a teenagers backpack? Three weeks into school and the protractor I asked them to buy is already in pieces in the bottom of their backpack. Books, binders, and a computer have been shoved into that backpack and the protractor is now broken. Or maybe they couldn’t afford school supplies to begin with. Protractors are not usually among the free supplies students can get. There are many reasons to use digital manipulatives, this is just one example, and inspiration behind my measuring angles activity. Created in Google Slides with a transparent protractor (google transparent protractor), students can move and rotate the protractor to practice measuring angles.

The balancing equations activity and the algebra tiles were created out of need for manipulatives but no funds to purchase them. Creating them digitally allowed me to have a set of manipulatives for every student.

A third reason to use digital manipulatives, blended and virtual learning. In this crazy Covid-19 time, we can’t send algebra tiles home with students, and not everyone has a protractor or ruler at home, but we can provide them with one digitally.

I create my manipulatives in Google Slides, but Google Drawing will work too. You can set any piece that you don’t want to move as the background so students don’t get frustrated. I may have learned this that hard way. Design the parts you don’t want to move. When you are ready, go to File – Download as PNG. Then click on the background button in the toolbar and choose an image from a file. Once the image is uploaded, you can delete everything. Your background will be behind it all. After your background is set, start creating the moving parts or parts you want the to type in.

Here are three digital manipulatives I’ve created for my classroom. If you use these in your classroom or with virtual learning, I would love to hear how it goes.

Balancing Equations MMNS                     Algebra Tiles MMNS

Measure Angles with Protractor MMNS