Posted in Activities, Geometry, Google Slides, Questioning, Thinking Questions

Thinking Questions

This idea came from Alice Keeler and the late Diana Herrington’s book Teaching Math with Google Apps. I have wanted to implement it for some time and even had some conversations with Alice about how she is currently using it. This year I finally created some. The whole point behind this type of question is to get student to look up information, explain their thinking, and persevere until they have it correct.

Now, Alice does a much more in depth version of this, and I LOVE it, but my students aren’t ready for it yet. We will get there!

I give the students a question on a slide. One portion is for their answer, another portion is for them to explain their thinking. I leave comments and return them if they need correction or more in depth explanation. Taking some advice from Alice, I started off by giving students credit as quickly as possible. They will get frustrated and quit if they have to resubmit too many times. If the response if VERY incorrect, I will conference with the student face -to -face so we can discuss their misconceptions and they can be more successful with their next submission. I only give one of these a week and I do give them a grade for it. But remember, they can resubmit based on feedback as many times as needed.

Here are some examples of thinking questions I’ve given Geometry so far.

I don’t assign points for practice but I’m making the exception for this. I feel like the effort and perseverance creates a deeper mathematical understanding. The students have responded well to it and most students turn it in successfully.

As always, let me know if you use this idea in your classroom.

 

Posted in Activities, Bitmoji, Geometry, Google Slides, Transformations

Transformation Comics

This is a lesson that I originally found here. It has gone through many iterations. You can see the progression of these on my sister blog Infinitely Teaching if you want a paper version of this project. I love this project because students have to take the transformation words and work them into their comic. They also use the transformation tools inside drawing or slides to actually transform their superhero.  This year we created Bitmojis and used those in combination with the Jachimo template from SlidesCarnival or template from the ever wonderful Sylvia Duckworth and my students loved it more than they ever have before. It’s amazing what adding a personalized Bitmoji will do for student engagement.

Here is the example I gave my students. We also had a quick exploratory lesson about how to transform the Bitmojis through the arrange menu (or 2 finger click or key command) and a quick lesson on how to crop and mask images.

Superhero Transformations.png

I was even more impressed after my students submitted their projects.

Example 1     Example 2    Example 3

I’ve included the template I gave my students but they weren’t limited to these templates. They had the freedom to create their comics however they saw fit. Remember, giving students choices will make them own their learning more.

Template to create your own (make a copy to edit it)

Please, if you use any of the provided templates, credit the correct person. SlidesCarnival is a wonderful resource and Sylvia has taken a lot of time to put her slide deck together as well.

As always, drop me a note if you use this project. I love to hear from teachers who find these projects useful.